Principal Investigator

Email: 
petzold [at] engineering [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-5362
Address: 
BioEngineering Building, Office 3106
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5100

The research of Professor Petzold focuses on modeling, analysis, simulation and software for multiscale systems in biology and materials. Current application areas include systems biology of circadian rhythm and cell polarization, translational medicine for coagulopathy and post-traumatic stress disorder, ecology, social networks and materials at the molecular scale. The group is building an integrated development environment for multiscale, discrete stochastic simulation and analysis of simulation data that scales from desktop to cloud computing. The main commonalities in the work are development of multiscale computational methodology including both discrete stochastic simulation and differential equations, and the study of dynamics on networks.

Professor Petzold is a faculty member in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Department of Computer Science, and an affiliated faculty member in the Department of Mathematics. She is the Director of the Computational Science and Engineering Graduate Emphasis. She leads the CSE lab. She is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of ACM, ASME, SIAM and AAAS. She was named the UCSB Faculty Research Lecturer for 2011, and was awarded the SIAM/ACM Prize for Computational Science and Engineering in 2013.

Faculty

Email: 
ralph [at] eri [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-8441
Address: 
Department of Earth Science
Webb Hall, Office 2007
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9630

Professor Archuleta's research interests include observing, analyzing and predicting strong motion from earthquakes. Following up on these interests involves dissecting the problem into more manageable pieces: collecting data, modeling the earthquake process itself, and understanding wave propagation in heterogeneous geological structures.

Email: 
atzber [at] math [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-3239
Address: 
Department of Mathematics
South Hall, Office 6712
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5070

The research of Professor Atzberger focuses on problems at the interface of stochastic analysis, statistical mechanics, and scientific computation. His work is strongly motivated by problems arising in soft condensed matter physics and biophysics. He also works on general stochastic numerical methods and software for the mechanics of fluid-structure interactions subject to thermal fluctuations. A common theme in his research is the analysis and development of computational methods to investigate phenomena arising in applications described by stochastic partial differential equations.

Professor Atzberger studied mathematics at the Courant Institute at New York University where he received his PhD in 2003. From 2003 - 2006 he was a postdoctoral fellow at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He joined the faculty at the University of California Santa Barbara in 2006. He is a receipt of the NSF Career Award and the Hellman Faculty Fellowship.

Email: 
begley [at] engr [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 679-1122
Address: 
Department of Mechanical Engineering
2361B Engineering II Building
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5070

Professor Begley’s research focus is on theoretical mechanics and advanced simulations to guide materials development, with an emphasis on multilayered systems, interfaces and composites. He has more than 100 archival publications: topics include thermal barrier coatings, environmental barrier coatings, the mechanical integrity of microelectronics, advanced simulations of virtual tests, bio-inspired composites and adhesives, novel 3D printing strategies for two-phase materials, acoustic assembly of colloidal particles, the structural integrity of microelectronics, nano-porous gold, and the performance of microfabricated devices for biochemical diagnostics. These works draw heavily on expertise in interfacial fracture mechanics, adhesion, structure-property relationships in multi-phase materials, numerical techniques for highly non-linear systems, multiscale plasticity, and multifunctional component design.

Email: 
briggs [at] lifesci [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-2199
Address: 
Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology
Noble Hall, Office 2112
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9620

Professor Briggs’ research combines modeling and experiments to understand the factors affecting the dynamics of animal populations. Her lab is working on a number of projects involving disease-host or parasitoid-host interactions, including:

The Frog-killing Chytrid Fungus in the California Sierra Nevada: The Briggs lab is investigating the factors that allow for persistence of populations of mountain yellow-legged frogs infected with the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, through a combination of field surveys, experiments, genetics, molecular techniques, and modeling.

Lyme Disease in Southern California: Lyme disease, caused by bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi, is maintained in the wild in vertebrate hosts, and transmitted between hosts by ticks. Lyme disease has a much higher prevalence in the eastern US than in California. The Briggs lab is studying the dynamics of the tick, pathogen, and vertebrate host communities in Southern California to understand the factors contributing to the low pathogen prevalence in this area.

Email: 
flbrown [at] chem [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-5494
Address: 
Department of Chemistry
Chemistry Building, Office 4126
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9510

Professor Brown's research  is entirely theoretical/computational in nature. Our interests lie at the interface between physical chemistry and biophysics and we use a variety of tools spanning the traditional fields of statistical mechanics, hydrodynamics, elasticity theory and quantum mechanics in our research efforts. Recent work has focused on the dynamics and structure of biomembranes and the interpretation of various spectroscopy experiments (single molecule fluorescence, neutron spin echo, flicker spectroscopy, etc.).

Email: 
campas [at] engineering [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-4015
Address: 
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Engineering II Bldg., Office 2334
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5070

The research of Professor Campás focuses on morphogenesis and self-organization of living systems. His group combines theory and experiments, as well as concepts from physics, biology, materials science and engineering, to obtain a global (or 'systems') understanding of the problems they work on. Their current interests span several topics such as embryonic development, tissue growth, cell shape, and morphological variation. Theoretical work in his group includes concepts from non-linear physics (dynamical systems), graph theory, fluid mechanics and soft-matter physics. Experimental work includes microfluidics, mechanics, microscopy, genetics, etc.

Professor Campás is a faculty member in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and in the Center for Bioengineering. He did his PhD in Biological Physics at the Curie Institute (Paris), and his postdoctoral research in Applied Mathematics and Physics at Harvard University. He also performed part of his postdoctoral research at Harvard Medical School and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard. He currently holds a Mellichamp Endowed Chair in Systems Biology.

Email: 
carlson [at] physics [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-8345
Address: 
Department of Physics
Broida Hall, Office 6123
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530

Professor Carlson's research investigates robustness, tradeoffs, and feedback in complex, highly connected systems, and develops multi-scale models to capture important small-scale details and predict large-scale behavior.

Email: 
hdc [at] math [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-3462
Address: 
Department of Mathematics
South Hall, Office 6710
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5070

Professor Ceniceros’ research is in the area of numerical methods for free boundary problems, complex fluids and soft materials. His work includes the design, analysis, and application of adaptive and multiscale methods, immersed boundary-type methods, boundary integral approaches, phase field and field-theoretic models.

Dr. Ceniceros is a Professor in the Department of Mathematics. He received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences-New York University and was a postdoctoral fellow at Caltech. He has held Visiting Faculty appointments at UCLA, Caltech, and the Universidade de Sao Paulo. Among his honors are being a plenary speaker at an American Mathematical Society meeting, three keynote addresses at international conferences, one distinguished lecture, and the Mochizuki teaching award.

Email: 
shiv [at] ece [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-7542
Address: 
Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering
Harold Frank Hall, Office 3109
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9560

Professor Chandrasekaran's current research interests include the development of fast numerical algorithms for structured matrices. He is also interested in the development of new efficient and accurate higher-order schemes for the discretization and solution of differential and integral equations.

Email: 
timcheng [at] ece [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-7294
Address: 
Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering
Harold Frank Hall, Office 4109
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9560

Professor Cheng manages two research labs: SoC Design and Test Lab and Learning-based Multimedia Lab. The SoC Design and Test Lab focuses on developing methodologies, algorithms, techniques, and tools for validating, verifying, testing, and analyzing system-on-chip (SoC), flexible electronics, and 3D devices. The Learning-Based Multimedia (LBMM) Group has wide interests in various algorithms and techniques for multimedia applications, but its current focus is Mobile Computer Vision, Mobile Augmented Reality, and Medical Image Viewing: addressing the main challenges for achieving the required real-time performance of vision and medical image viewing tasks with minimum energy consumption in a mobile, embedded environment, including designing a new energy-efficient parallel architecture for these tasks.

Email: 
mfd [at] engineering [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-5309
Address: 
Department of Chemical Engineering
Engineering II, Office 3323
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5080

Professor Doherty's current research interests include: combining reactions and separations, crystallization of organic materials, and systems with complex chemistries. The approach links the underlying physical and organic chemistry to the structure of the process flowsheet, and involves theoretical, experimental and computational methods. Applications are focused on specialty chemicals and pharmaceuticals.

Separation with Chemical Reaction: Combining separation with chemical reaction has the potential to create quantum improvements in process technology through the enhancement of reactions by separation (e.g., overcoming reaction equilibrium limitations, selectivity improvement), and by the improvement of separation by reaction (e.g., eliminating azeotropes, reacting away trace components, etc.) Our research is focused on developing new feasibility methods using geometric techniques such as residue curve maps, bifurcation analysis, and attainable regions. This information is used to identify process alternatives, which are ranked by economic performance measures once equipment sizes have been estimated.

Crystallization of Organic Materials: The main focus of this research is to study the effect of process design and operation on crystal quality for organic-solids processes. The key measures of quality that we are interested in are, enantiomorph (for chiral mixtures), polymorph, and crystal shape. Crystal shape can have a major impact on processing as well as product quality. We are developing new methods to account for solution effects, with the ultimate goal of using these new methods to account for crystal shape, as well as enantiomorph and polymorph selection in the conceptual design of solids processes.

Email: 
fouque [at] pstat [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-2129
Address: 
Department of Statistics and Probability
South Hall, Office 5504
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3110

Professor Fouque’s research focuses on Stochastic Processes, Stochastic Partial Differential Equations, Waves in Random Media and Financial Mathematics.

Jean-Pierre Fouque studied at the University Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris. He held positions at the French CNRS and Ecole Polytechnique, and at North Carolina State University. Since 2006, he is Professor and Director of the Center for Research in Financial Mathematics and Statistics at the University of California Santa Barbara. He was elected Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics in 2009, Chair of the SIAM Activity Group in Financial Mathematics (2009-2010), and Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) in 2011.

Email: 
ghf [at] mrl [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-8308
Address: 
Materials Research Laboratory
MRL Bldg., Office 3105
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5070

Professor Fredrickson’s group conducts a broad range of research activities in theoretical and computational polymer science, many of these aimed at understanding self-assembling polymers and complex fluids, and especially block copolymer systems. A computational tool that is unique to the group is the "Field-Theoretic Simulation" technique, which is a numerical procedure for simulating statistical field theory models of complex polymer formulations. The group also maintains strong interactions with experimental teams in academia and industry throughout the world.

Professor Fredrickson obtained his Ph.D. at Stanford University in 1984 and subsequently joined AT&T Bell Laboratories, where he was named Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff in 1989. In 1990 he moved to the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB), joining the faculties of the Chemical Engineering and Materials Departments. He served as Chair of Chemical Engineering from 1998 to 2001 and in 2001 founded the Mitsubishi Chemical Center for Advanced Materials (MC-CAM). Professor Fredrickson currently holds the Mitsubishi Chemical Endowed Chair in Functional Materials and serves as MC-CAM Director, and Director of UCSB’s Complex Fluids Design Consortium. Recent honors include the Polymer Physics Prize of the American Physical Society, the Cooperative Research Award in Polymer Science and Engineering of the American Chemical Society, the Alpha Chi Sigma Award of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Collaboration Success Award of the Council for Chemical Research, and election to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering USA.

Email: 
fgibou [at] engineering [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-7152
Address: 
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Engineering II Bldg., Office 2335
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5070

The research of Professor Gibou is focused on the design and on the applications of high-resolution computational methods for a variety of challenging applications including Free Boundary Problems, CFD, Multiphase Flows, Electrostatics, Materials Science, Computer Vision and Computer Graphics. The main commonality in these applications is that they are described by similar classes of nonlinear partial differential equations.

Professor Gibou is a faculty member in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, in the Department of Computer Science and in the Department of Mathematics. He also leads the CASL lab. He received his PhD from the Applied Mathematics Department at UCLA, and did his post-doctoral research in the Departments of Mathematics and Computer Science at Stanford University. He was awarded a Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship in Mathematics, the Regent’s Junior Faculty Fellowship, a NSF Mathematical Sciences Postdoctoral Fellowship and the Robert Sorgenfrey Distinguished Teaching award.

Email: 
gilbert [at] cs [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 448-6438
Address: 
Department of Computer Science
Harold Frank Hall, Office 5109
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5110

Professor Gilbert’s principal research contributions have been in algorithms and software for combinatorial and numerical problems. He has done fundamental work in sparse matrix techniques; he was a primary architect and developer of Matlab’s sparse matrix capability and of the SuperLU solver library.  Prof. Gilbert’s current research applies linear algebra and sparse matrix methods to emerging discrete problems in the analysis of large graphs and networks using high-performance computation.

Email: 
ckrintz [at] cs [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-8553
Address: 
Department of Computer Science
Harold Frank Hall, Office 2153
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5110

Professor Krintz leads a number of research projects that advance the state-of-the-art in programming systems in ways that improve performance and energy consumption, and that ease development and deployment of scalable distributed applications and software. Recently, her work targets multi-language runtime systems, cloud APIs and services, API composition and governance, and cloud computing platforms.

Prof. Krintz is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB). She joined the UCSB faculty in 2001 after receiving her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Chandra has advised over 60 undergraduate and graduate students, has published numerous research articles regarding the implementation of programming languages in venues that include ASPLOS, USENIX HotCloud and WebApps, IEEE Cloud, PLDI, OOPSLA and others, participates in efforts to broaden participation in computing, and is the progenitor of the AppScale project. Chandra's efforts have been recognized with a NSF CAREER award, the CRA-W Anita Borg Early Career Award (BECA), and the UCSB Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award.

Email: 
lgl20 [at] engineering [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-8510
Address: 
Department of Chemical Engineering
Engineering II Bldg., Office 3xxx
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5080

Professor Leal’s research is broadly in the areas of fluid mechanics and materials, the latter focused specifically on complex fluids. These problem areas present many multiscale challenges as length scales ranging from the macroscopic continuum level down to the molecular scale must often be achieved in a single computation. There are two types of problem. In one, a single level of physical description applies everywhere in the fluid domain, but there are orders of magnitude differences between the required level of numerical resolution in different parts of the domain. In the second, the range of scale is so great that one must use a molecular level description in some part of the domain, ranging to continuum descriptions elsewhere. In the first class of problems, we are interested in methods for development of dynamic and localized levels of numerical discretization in different parts of the flow domain. For the second class of problems, we are developing novel, new methods to couple MD and continuum calculations, via intermediate mesoscale particle-based simulations with fluctuations (SDPD), for both single component and multicomponent fluid systems. The existing methods, which attempt to directly couple MD and continuum calculations, are generally ineffective.

Professor Leal obtained his PhD in chemical engineering from Satnford University, and has also spent a postdoc and several other periods in the Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics at Cambridge University in the UK. He was a faculty member for 19 years at Caltech before joining UCSB in 1989. He has held the Chevron Chair at Caltech and the Schlinger Chair at UCSB. He is a member of the NAE and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and was awarded the Fluid Dynamics Prize from the APS, the Bingham Medal from the Society of Rheology and the Colburn and Walker Awards from the AIChE.

Email: 
ludkovski [at] pstat [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-5634
Address: 
Department of Statistics & Applied Probability
South Hall, Office 5520
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3110

Professor Ludkovski's research interests are in financial mathematics and applied probability, especially in the context of optimal stochastic control. His two primary areas of work concern:

Optimal switching problems. These are repeated optimal stopping models that can also be viewed as a simplified impulse control setting. They have wide applications in resource management, decision making under uncertainty and exotic derivatives.

Stochastic control under partial observations. Many operations research and financial applications feature agents that have limited knowledge of the stochastic environment. Thus, the problems they face require simultaneous estimation and control. I develop new computational algorithms to make this possible in a robust but tractable framework.

There are numerous applications of the above models; some that I have worked on in detail include Financial and Insurance Mathematics and Sequential Estimation and Control Models.

Email: 
rmcm [at] engineering [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805)893-8434
Address: 
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Engineering II, Office 2361A
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5070

Professor McMeeking's research is in on mechanics of materials, exploiting theoretical and computational methods to understand structural and functional performance of engineering materials. Recent focus has been on ferroelectric systems, utilization of high temperature materials composed of ceramics and ceramic composites, actuating and shape morphing structures, protection of structures from high intensity blast waves and accompanying shrapnel, and thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine blades.

Email: 
meiburg [at] engineering [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-5258
Address: 
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Engineering II Bldg., Office 2351
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5070

Professor Meiburg's research interests lie in the general area of fluid dynamics and transport phenomena. His group primarily employs the tools of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), in particular highly resolved direct numerical simulations, in order to obtain insight into the physical mechanisms that govern the spatio-temporal evolution of a wide variety of geophysical, porous media and multiphase flow fields. Occasionally, his group extends their analyses to address issues of linear stability as well. Frequently, they collaborate closely with corresponding experimental investigations. Some current interests focus on gravity and turbidity currents, Hele-Shaw displacements, double-diffusive phenomena in particle laden flows, and internal bores.

Professor Meiburg is a faculty member in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at UCSB, and he directs the Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Fluids (http://www.cirf.ucsb.edu/). He received his Ph.D. from the University of Karlsruhe in Germany and was a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University. Following faculty positions at Brown University and the University of Southern California, Professor Meiburg joined UCSB in 2000. He served as chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering from 2003-2007. He has received a Presidential Young Investigator Award, a Senior Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, a Senior Gledden Fellowship from the Institute of Advanced Studies at the University of Western Australia, and a First Prize at Scottish Offshore Achievement Awards. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Email: 
meiring [at] pstat [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-8328
Address: 
Department of Statistics & Applied Probability
South Hall, Office 5510
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3110

Professor Meiring's research focuses on statistics of space-time processes, evaluation of geophysical models, and environmental statistics.

Email: 
moehlis [at] engineering [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-7513
Address: 
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Engineering II, Office 2341
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5070

Professor Moehlis' research interests involve using techniques from dynamical systems theory to understand and control natural and technological systems. His application areas include neuroscience (developing algorithms for controlling neurons, inspired by deep brain stimulation of patients with Parkinson's Disease), turbulence (understanding the transition to and nature of shear flow turbulence), energy harvesting (converting vibrational energy to useful power), and collective behavior (fish schooling, social networks, group decision making).

Email: 
nisbet [at] lifesci [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-7115
Address: 
Department of Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology
Noble Hall, Office 2001
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9620

Professor Nisbet's research covers many areas of theoretical ecology. The overarching theme is the use of “individual-based” or “structured” population models to relate population dynamics to the physiology and behavior of individual members of a population. Much work is based on Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory to describe the rates at which individual organisms assimilate and utilize energy and elemental matter. My research group both develops new fundamental theory and applies it to environmental problems. Current applications include ecotoxicology, coral biology, zooplankton ecology and fish bioenergetics. I am on the Executive Committee of the University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology, and am an investigator in the Moorea Coral Reef (MCR) LTER project. I am also continuing some work on a long-standing interest: population dynamics in streams and rivers.

Email: 
baronp [at] engineering [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-6131
Address: 
Department of Chemical Engineering
Engineering II, Office 3339
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5080

Professor Peters' research focuses on the kinetics of nucleation, electron transfer, and catalytic reactions depend on the properties of short-lived and rarely-visited transition states that cannot be directly observed in experiments. We gain insight into the properties of transition states using molecular simulation and electronic structure theory. Examples include the effects of solution additives on nucleation rates for crystallization, the dominant electron transfer conduits in realistic fluctuating environments, and catalytic reaction mechanisms. When applications pose new challenges beyond the scope of available techniques, we develop theories and algorithms to address those challenges. In particular, we specialize in path sampling methods for free energies and reaction coordinate identification, metrics for reaction coordinate error, methods to obtain accurate rate constants, and multiscale simulation approaches.

Email: 
shea [at] chem [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-5604
Address: 
Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry
Chemistry Building, Office 4130
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9510

Professor Shea's research focuses on developing and applying the techniques of statistical and computational physics to the study of biological problems. Current work involves the investigation of cellular processes such as in-vivo protein folding and protein aggregation.

Email: 
shell [at] engineering [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-4346
Address: 
Department of Chemical Engineering
Engineering II Bldg., Office 3321
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5080

The research group of Professor Shell uses molecular simulation and theory to understand multiscale, hierarchical interactions in complex soft-matter systems, including peptides, proteins, water and aqueous solutions, electrolyte solutions, and hard particle systems. In particular, his group develops general methods for understanding self-assembly behavior, and is designing new approaches for linking simulations and theories across multiple length and time scales in fundamental, rigorous ways. These efforts are used to understand (1) folding and design principles in proteins; (2) peptide structure, association, self-assembly, and aggregation; and (3) the role of water and the hydrophobic interactions in driving self-assembly processes; (4) the physics of nanobubbles; (5) the thermodynamics of electric double layers; and (6) shape-dictated assembly in hard particle systems.

Professor Shell is a Professor in the Chemical Engineering Department at UC Santa Barbara, having joined the university in 2007. His group develops novel molecular simulation, multiscale modeling, and statistical thermodynamic approaches to address a variety problems in contemporary biophysics and soft condensed matter. Prof. Shell earned his B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon in 2000 and his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Princeton in 2005, followed by two years of postdoctoral work at UC San Francisco in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry. He is the recipient of a Dreyfus Foundation New Faculty Award (2007), an NSF CAREER Award (2009), a Hellman Family Faculty Fellowship (2010), a Northrop-Grumman Teaching Award (2011), and a Sloan Research Fellowship (2012).

Email: 
davey [at] eri [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-4547
Address: 
Department of Geography
Ellison Hall, Office 6844
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4060

Professor Siegel's research interests are interdisciplinary oceanography investigating physical, biological, optical and biogeochemical couplings on micro to ocean basin scales. Specifically, satellite ocean color remote sensing and optical oceanography, scale interaction in ecological and population systems, role of radiative exchange in air-sea interactions, and data information systems

Email: 
toshiro [at] geol [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-8375
Address: 
Department of Earth Science
Webb Hall, Office 2112
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9630

Professor Tanimoto's research focuses on understanding Earth structure from the surface to the center. It requires understanding of how seismic waves propagate in the interior, the higher frequency end being heavily scattered, messy waves above 1 Hz and the lower frequency end being the ringings of the whole Earth around 1000 seconds.
 

Email: 
vandewalle [at] mrl [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-7144
Address: 
Materials Department
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5050

Professor Van de Walle leads the Computational Materials group and develops and employs first-principles techniques to model the structure and behavior of materials. He has performed extensive studies of semiconductor interfaces and of defects and impurities in semiconductors, with particular emphasis on doping problems and on the role of hydrogen. He has made important contributions to the understanding of wide-band-gap semiconductors, including the nitride materials used for solid-state lighting; oxides for use as transparent conductors or in novel electronic applications; and hydrogen storage materials. His work on Auger recombination and free-carrier absorption has provided new insights in loss mechanisms in optoelectronic devices.

Chris G. Van de Walle has been a Professor in the Materials Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara since 2004. Prior to joining UCSB he was a Principal Scientist at Xerox PARC (1991-2004). He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 1987 from Stanford University, performed postdoctoral research at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center (1986-1988), and joined Philips Laboratories in Briarcliff Manor, New York (1988-1991). Professor Van de Walle is a Fellow of the APS, the AVS, the AAAS, the MRS, and the IEEE, and the recipient of a Humboldt Award for Senior US Scientist, the 2002 David Adler Award from the APS, and the 2013 Medard W. Welch Award from the AVS.

Email: 
avdv [at] engineering [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-7920
Address: 
Department of Materials
Engineering II, Office 1361A
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5050

Professor Van der Ven's research seeks to develop first-principles descriptions of non-equilibrium processes in the solid state with a particular goal of generating an understanding of the mechanisms of phase transformations that couple diffusion and structural changes. His group develops and applies first-principles statistical mechanics methods to predict equilibrium and non-equilibrium materials properties. They study a wide range of materials classes, including transition metal oxides and sulfides for energy storage and conversion devices, metallic alloys for aerospace and automotive applications and oxides and hydrides of importance in corrosion processes in nuclear applications.

Email: 
xyan [at] cs [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 699-6018
Address: 
Department of Computer Science
Harold Frank Hall, Office 1111
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5110

The primary goal of Professor Yan research is to develop fundamental concepts and new principles of data mining, design intelligent algorithms and build scalable systems. Our current work has concentrated on three key areas: Modeling, managing, and mining large-scale, heterogeneous graphs/networks; Structural and statistical analysis of texts and derived applications such as information extraction, question answering, and information trustworthiness; Intelligent solutions to various cross-domain problems in bioinformatics, business intelligence, computer security, computer systems, and social science.

Prof. Yan holds the Venkatesh Narayanamurti Chair of Computer Science. He received his Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2006. He was a research staff member at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center between 2006 and 2008. His works were extensively referenced, with over 8,000 citations per Google Scholar and thousands of software downloads. He received the NSF CAREER Award, the IBM Invention Achievement Award, the ACM-SIGMOD Dissertation Runner-Up Award, and the IEEE ICDM 10-year Highest Impact Paper Award.

Email: 
tyang [at] cs [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-4321
Address: 
Department of Computer Science
Harold Frank Hall, Office 5113
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5110

Professor Yang’s recent research is in the fields of information retrieval and search, and cloud systems. His past research includes search engines, scalable web services and middleware, scheduling and runtime support for parallel irregular computation, and parallel sparse matrix algorithms.

Professor Yang joined the Department of Computer Science at UCSB in 1993. His research has been in the areas of parallel and distributed systems, web search/mining, and high performance computing with over 100 refereed papers and patents. He served as Chief Scientist for Ask.com (formally Ask Jeeves) from 2001 to early 2010, and also Senior Vice President of Ask.com as the head of its search engineering division in various periods for the development of Ask.com search engine and vertical products. He was the founding Chief Scientist and Vice President of Research and Development from 2000 to 2001 for Teoma.com. He visited Microsoft Bing for search technology R&D in 2010-2011 and advised Panguso.com on search technology in 2012-2013.

Email: 
zhengzhang [at] ece [dot] ucsb [dot] edu
Phone: 
(805) 893-7294
Address: 
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Harold Frank Hall, Office 4109
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9560

Professor Zhang's research interests include uncertainty quantification, tensor computation and model order reduction, with multi-domain applications including design verification and optimization of nano-scale devices and systems (VLSI, MEMS and integrated photonics), modeling and verification of uncertain dynamic systems (e.g., autonomous and robotic systems), and high-dimensional computation for machine learning and biomedical imaging (e.g, MRI).